Must Read

Here are some of our favorite resources for leadership, team building, creative reflection, and just plain interesting reads! To browse the complete Acumennial Bookshelf, click here.

Essentials for anyone interested in becoming a generous leader.

advantageIn The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business
Patrick Lencioni makes an overwhelming case that organizational health will surpass all other disciplines in business as the greatest opportunity for improvement and competitive advantage. Drawing on his extensive consulting experience and reaffirming many of the themes cultivated in his other best-selling books, Pat reveals the four actionable steps to achieving long-term, sustainable success. (The Table Group)

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For more than 25 years, The Leadership Challenge has been the most trusted source on becoming a better leader, selling more than 2 million copies in over 20 languages since its first publication. Based on Kouzes and Posner's extensive research, this all-new edition casts their enduring work in context for today's world, proving how leadership is a relationship that must be nurtured, and most importantly, that it can be learned. (Amazon.com Review)

Book_Drive

Most of us believe that the best way to motivate ourselves and others is with external rewards like money—the carrot-and-stick approach. That’s a mistake, Daniel H. Pink says in, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, his provocative and persuasive book. The secret to high performance and satisfaction—at work, at school, and at home—is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world. (DanPink.com)

Seven-Pillars-of-Servant-Leadership

Seven Pillars of Servant Leadership not only explains the basics of Servant Leadership but also answers the question, “How do I begin implementing Servant Leadership in my workplace?” (www.greenleaf.org)

 

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John Kotter offers a practical approach to an organized means of leading, not managing, change in his classic Leading Change. He presents an eight-stage process of change with highly useful examples that show how to go about implementing it. Based on experience with numerous companies, his sound advice gets directly at reasons that organizations fail to change, reasons that concern primarily the leader. This is a solid, substantive work that goes beyond the cliches and the consultant-of-the-month’s express down yet another dead-end street. (www.kotterinternational.com)