Tag Archives: gravitas

Equitable Leadership – Worth the Effort

My last LeaderSips blog took on what I consider to be - for the most part - a lazy and unfair leadership style: the "equal" approach. And judging from the response, I thought the topic warranted a deeper gulp rather than a morning sip.

While the opinion that "equal is unfair" seems counterintuitive, consider this scenario: you have enough money budgeted to send 2 colleagues to a week long training course. If you ascribe to the equal approach, you will put all the names of your department in a hat and let fate take its course. This will not take into account your employees who have the skills and the interest in the course. Nor will it recognize the employees who have worked hard at bringing their skill set to the point that additional training will be beneficial. It will send a message to your entire team that individual effort means nothing.

But you can rest easy because you treated everyone equally, right? Um, no.

For those who fall on the side of "equal" I make this argument: every employee is not equal. Their abilities, attitude, history, and contributions are all different. If, by chance, you have two employees who truly are equal - then by all means, treat them exactly the same. This will serve you particularly well if your team is made up of Stepford wives.

If, on the other hand, your team is comprised of humans, you might explore equitability. Taking this approach means more work. It means spending more time developing policies that are flexible, fair, and reasonable. It means knowing the needs, talents, and accomplishments of your employees. It means you know who has made significant contributions and you know who is skating by.

Often the fear of a disgruntled employee making accusations of favoritism keeps leaders from equitable decisions. The good news is, we're not in kindergarten. Support your decisions with facts, not opinions. This keeps you from going on the defensive - and gives you an opportunity to work with employees who feel they have been mistreated. "Why yes, David, Susan is going to the conference. You and I have talked about your attendance record, your inability to meet a deadline, and the customer complaints we've received. When you have shown demonstrable improvement in these areas, you certainly will be a candidate for a conference."

The decision then is in their hands. If they opt to put in the time and effort that is required, they can be afforded the same chances as their peers. Equal leadership gives everyone the same reward, regardless of effort. Equitable leadership ensures everyone knows where they are on the playing field - how close they are to the goal line, and what they must do to score. As a leader, it is requires a great deal of work. But if you are asking your team for extra effort, shouldn't you be doing the same for them?

3 Reasons Why “Equitable” Is More Effective Than “Equal”

I once coached a rising leader who insisted on treating her employees exactly the same way. She couldn't understand why she had so many HR issues. On the face of it, you might be thinking, "well, come on, that's the best way to be an effective leader." I disagree. Continue reading

3 Ways to Recruit Effectively

Putting together a cohesive team is one of the most important roles of a leader. A misstep in the hiring process can cost in time, money, and morale.

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3 Ways To Give Feedback That is Actually Helpful

If you're an effective leader, you know that waiting for the annual review to give your employee feedback is an utter waste of time. Ongoing, in-the-moment feedback is the best way to provide your employees with information that

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3 Reasons To Love Leading Millennials 


I don't know about you, but I'm sick of millennial-bashing cliches. Do they have some annoying traits? Of course. Guess what Boomers and X-ers, we were no prize either.

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4G Leadership: Gravitas – Not Just A $5 Word

3 QUICK JOLTS OF LEADERSHIP INSIGHT

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Mark Twain memorably said, "Don't use a five-dollar word when a fifty-cent word will do."  He makes an excellent point. But in the case of gravitas there simply is no other word that encapsulates this multi-faceted leadership trait.

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Assessing Your Executive Presence

 

executive presence

Do people stop and notice when you begin speaking? Do you have the ability to command a room? If you do, then you have executive presence. If you're not sure, then chances are you don't. How do you cultivate this important yet elusive trait?

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3 Elements of Executive Presence

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3 QUICK JOLTS OF

LEADERSHIP INSIGHT

When people describe someone as a "natural leader" they are generally responding to a combination of traits known as executive presence. If you're  looking to strengthen your leadership, here's 3 elements you should consider.

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