How to Undermine Your Team in 10 Easy Steps

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You could be the Cal Ripken, Jr.  of your team - the ultimate team player who not only produces above and beyond what you get paid to produce, but also adds that intangible element which helps bring a team together - you could be all of that, and still occasionally undermine your team without realizing it. Impossible? See if any of these scenarios feel familiar:

1. You insisted on doing something you are not good at.

​Next time, put up your hand and ask for help. Great team players use the team to make them better.

2. You missed a chance to provide feedback to a team member.

​Next time, when you see a concrete example of how a team member can raise his or her game, don't let the chance slip away.

3. You waited for your boss to address an issue that needed clarification or improvement.

Next time, raise the issue and its impact on the team.

4. You agreed to do something you don't have time to do well.

​Next time, discuss the items on your priority list before giving a knee-jerk response.

5. You didn't speak up at staff meeting or line-up.

Next time, add value. Your personal insight is unlike anyone else's. 

6. You allowed your personal feelings of a team member interfere with your opinion about his or her work.

Next time, objectively view the work, leave the personality at the door. Be more discerning about the work of people you like, more open about the work of the people you dislike.

7. You watched while someone shut down a team member who had a different opinion or idea.

Next time, stand up for a team member's idea. You may not agree with it in its entirety, but diversity of thought is the first step in creating an innovative team.

​8. You wrote off a team member as being frustrating, disrespectful, or wrong - simply because he or she takes a different approach or has a different style.

​Next time, try to build a relationship with that person to find ways you can complement one another.

9. You went to a third party to complain about a team member without taking it to that person first.

Next time, act like a mature adult and go to the source.

10. You socialize on your breaks and at lunch with the same people every day.

​Next time, ask someone you don't know or don't spend time with to join you. Teams are built on healthy relationships.

So, Cal... how'd you do? Is there anything you're going to try a little differently today​?

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